Privacy


There has been increasing press coverage pertaining to developments of anti-surveillance clothing and paraphernalia to counter the effectiveness of face recognition, such as this recent article in the Guardian: Anti-surveillance clothing aims to hide wearers from facial recognition.     The real issue with regards to the continuous development of anti-surveillance paraphernalia and the ability of technology suppliers to circumvent it is not an issue of technology, but rather a social one. Advocates and opponents will continuously be leap-frogging each other with their ability to detect and to counter. What we should be focusing on is understanding the reason for dissent […]

The Rise of Anti-Surveillance Clothing


  Massively interesting talk, that steers through the issues and concepts expertly. Too often the debate is positioned at its polarised extremes: Privacy is dead, bring on the technology Kill the technology, save our privacy … but I fervently believe it’s not a dichotomy. The always connected world and the ever increasing need for us to share more and more information does not kill privacy, it fuels the need for it. With the current rate of change, to refuse to share data will disenfranchise one from society. But as we “need” to share data, we should focus more and more […]

Why Privacy Matters


Allevate’s Carl Gohringer is pleased to be participating as a panellist at this week’s debate at Biometrics 2013 on privacy within the context of biometrics. Tuesday 15th October, 1600, Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, UK http://www.biometrics2013.com/programme.asp   Privacy at the cross road: A debate on frameworks As biometrics become part of our daily lives, the issue of privacy and the protection of personal identifiable information (PII) such as biometric data is beginning to take centre stage. There will be an exciting opportunity for anonymous audience participation via mobile devices. This debate will review the pressing issues with respect to […]

Biometrics 2013: Privacy at the cross road: A debate on ...




2
You can download a PDF copy of this article by clicking this link. The accuracy of face recognition has increased dramatically. Though biometric technologies have typically been deployed by governments and law enforcement agencies to ensure public, transport and border safety, this improvement in accuracy has not gone unnoticed by retailers and other commercial organisations. Niche biometric companies are being snapped up by internet and social media behemoths to further their commercial interests, and retailers and other enterprises are experimenting with the technology to categorise customers, analyse trends and identify VIPs and repeat spenders. Whilst the benefits to business are clear […]

Article: Face Recognition: Profit, Ethics and Privacy


Interesting article in London’s Independent newspaper on CCTV surveillance and face biometrics. Especially interesting is the view of the combination of biometrics over CCTV with artificial intelligence and behavioral recognition, as this does appear to be the way things are moving. I agree that biometrics, and especially face recognition, can provide huge benefit to society. I also agree that there is a certain level of concern and distrust by large swathes of the population, some of it well-founded, and some of it based on misperception and incorrect knowledge. In either case, I think it is dangerous to simply dismiss these […]

“From grainy CCTV to a positive ID: Recognising the benefits ...



The UK Department of Education has announced that schools will no longer be permitted to take pupils’ fingerprints or other biometric data without gaining parents’ permission. I am a firm believer in the use of biometric technology to further public safety and efficiency. However, a key consideration in the use of this technology should be proportionality; is the collection of such sensitive data justified for the benefit realised? Biometric data by its very nature is sensitive and absolute assurance must be provided that it will managed, secured and used appropriately. Given this, the consent of those whose data will be captured should […]

UK Schools banned from fingerprinting pupils without parental consent


2
A very interesting piece to spark debate regarding safety versus privacy. WARNING: There are one or two minor instances of less than desirable language, mainly due to the state of annoyance of those being videoed. I do not believe (though I’m not a legal expert) that the person filming did anything illegal, yet people clearly took offence at his actions. The point the cameraman is obviously trying to make is why then do people so willingly accept being recorded by surveillance cameras? I think the main point this film misses, in my opinion, is that people do not understand the purpose […]

Man Films People in Public. Interesting Statement on Surveillance and ...


1
Biometric security: More bottom-line benefits, less James Bond Carl Gohringer December 03, 2003 Bond movies will always be associated with state-of-the-art technology, but few of the products he uses or encounters ever make it into the real world. A car that turns into a submarine might be nice to have or an umbrella that transforms into a rope ladder useful on the odd occasion, but their uses in everyday life are limited. There is one exception to the James Bond rule – biometrics – the technology that uses unique, physical geometry to identify and authenticate individuals. According to market research […]

Biometric security: More bottom-line benefits, less James Bond



Allevate Presenting at Biometrics 2011 Synopsis Recent advances in the accuracy of face recognition are resulting in an explosion of its use, coupled with increasingly vociferous cries from privacy advocates. The benefits from the uses of this technology are clear. But does it enable even further and easier harvesting of private information about us as individuals, without our knowledge or consent? This presentation does not attempt to analyse the adherence of face recognition to the nuances of privacy legislation. Rather, it explores the emerging trends in the application of face recognition, from law enforcement and security / surveillance, through to […]

In the wake of the London riots, is the privacy ...


6
[polldaddy poll=5701230] A Surveillance Society? I’m sat in Heathrow waiting for an early morning departure for a business trip. Sipping my coffee, I look casually around trying to spot the cameras. They’re cleverly hidden. Am I being watched? Doubtful. Am I being recorded? Almost certainly. This is a daily fact of life for most Londoners. It’s widely known that our city is one of the most heavily recorded in the world; a fact that is consistently debated and often criticized. Yet for all the discussion, the fact remains. We don’t like it, but we accept it. Why? Personally, my true […]

Face Recognition: Improved Benefit? Or Erosion of Privacy?